SCIP database goes live: opportunities and challenges

With the SCIP database, ECHA - the European Chemicals Agency, makes available today a “data bank” of substances of very high concern in articles and products, as provided by companies supplying the latter to be placed on the EU market. 

With the SCIP database, ECHA - the European Chemicals Agency, makes available today a “data bank” of substances of very high concern in articles and products, as provided by companies supplying the latter to be placed on the EU market. The data made available to waste operators and consumers upon request, would promote non-toxic material cycles in the EU and increase transparency throughout the whole lifecycle of articles and products, including at the waste stage.

​​“The home appliance industry fully supports the objectives of the database,” commented Paolo Falcioni, APPLiA Director General. With this regard, “our member companies have and are still actively participating in a dedicated group of work, led by ECHA, shaping the implementation process of such a tool” added Mr Falcioni.  

While the introduction of the SCIP database represents an opportunity to bridge gaps in the information flow and, overall, facilitate the transition to a more sustainable material management, it is of foremost importance for the implementation of this tool to be properly aligned with its legal requirements. “APPLiA has been working closely with the European Chemicals Agency and the Commission, to ensure that the SCIP database would preserve intellectual property of private companies,” explained Mr Falcioni, highlighting the importance for the SCIP, as unique funnel of massive amounts of confidential information, to remain fully compliant with competition law rules. With this regard, the enforcement aspect of such legal obligations towards the database is also crucial. “Mandatory requirements need to be enforced, so as to deter free-riding and ensure all products on the EU market are SCIP-compliant,” explained APPLiA’s DG.  

A correct implementation of the SCIP Database must be aligned with its legal grounds and fully respect private intellectual property as well preserve confidential business information, as a strict minimum. “We will be in close contact with ECHA and the Commission to ensure these aspects are protected at all stages,” concluded Mr Falcioni.